Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Magical Quantums

aka on words and meaning

Study finds weird magic ingredient for quantum computing, June 2014
[^THIS IS NOT clickbait; it is the original title from a article] 

"Quantum devices are extremely difficult to build because they must operate in an environment that is noise-resistant. The term magic refers to a particular approach to building noise-resistant quantum computers known as magic-state distillation. So-called magic states act as a crucial, but difficult to achieve and maintain, extra ingredient that boosts the power of a quantum device to achieve the improved processing power of a universal quantum computer."

Magic states offer surprisingly low error rates for quantum computing, Mar 2015

Making quantum computers that are noise-resistant, or fault-tolerant, is one of the biggest challenges facing their development.

Currently, the leading approach to fault-tolerant quantum computing involves "magic states." First proposed in 2005 by Sergey Bravyi and Alexei Kitaev, magic states are quantum states that contain an acceptably low level of error. In order to create magic states, physicists take noisy quantum states and use a process called distillation to derive a smaller number of improved, i.e., higher fidelity, states. This process is repeated as many times as necessary until the states reach the target fidelity.

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